Michelle Chen
Workers in the U.S. and China are both struggling for dignity. Recent uprisings in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and on the mainland show that workers everywhere are finding ways to fight back.
Organizing Upgrade Editor
Editor’s Note: Earlier this year, OrgUp editors Calvin Cheung-Miaw and Max Elbaum published an article at In These Times on U.S.-China relations. In it, Cheung-Miaw and Elbaum outlined their case for the left to prioritize the fight for a 180-degree turnaround in the U.S. stance toward China, demanding that diplomacy and negotiation replace trade wars and military encirclement. We […]
Craig Collins
U.S. and China relations will have a profound impact upon the fate of the planet. And there is growing potential for climate activism to spark a fierce fire of green internationalism.
Ho-fung Hung
China's economic boom, from the 1990's all the way to the 2000's, was based on China's willingness to be a cooperative partner of the U.S. in the project of globalization. Wall Street, U.S. capital more generally, and the Jiang Zemin government made a deal in the 1990s. At the time of the State Owned Enterprise reforms in China, Wall Street firms were involved in the process of auditing companies and in privatization, eventually helping to throw many onto the New York and Hong Kong Stock exchanges. U.S. capital gained a lot of benefits from China's privatization and marketization process and at the same time the U.S. was opened up to China's exports. The U.S., in turn, helped China enter the WTO. This was a symbiotic relationship between U.S. and China in making the global economic order.