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CommunityCarethis piece was first posted on Adrienne Maree's blog, The Luscious Satyagraha
my friend b loewe wrote this blog an end to self-care, and i was moved to respond.

hi lovely b :)

thank you so much for putting this out there, i feel the energy of it. and as a community-supported self-care queen on day 8 of a juice cleanse, i have to engage.

my negative feelings on self-care kept me in a state of not caring for myself for years, delaying me in getting what i needed, keeping me in unhealthy movement spaces, feeling powerless and tired.

my community had to intervene. they generated the resources to send me off to take care of myself. if they hadn't done that, i don't know if i would be here at all.

Published in Community Care
Wednesday, 17 October 2012 03:00

Care is the Core of Change | Subhash Kateel

CommunityCareYesterday, an old colleague from the immigrant rights movement, B. Loewe wrote a thought provoking piece on self-care titled, "An End to Self Care." After I read the piece, I told him how hard it was to not have an immediate and viscerally negative reaction to it. After we spoke, I realized that some of my reaction was based more on what I thought he was saying than what he was actually saying. But other parts of my reaction felt valid enough for me to respond to the piece.

Most of B.'s (I really should have asked him how to put an apostrophe by his name) primary point, as I understood it, is compelling enough:

"..self-care... inherently rejects collective responsibility for each other's well-being..."

But as I kept reading, I got a sense of where my reaction was coming from:

Published in Community Care

CommunityCare

B Loewe recently wrote this article: An End to Self Care. Many folks on my Facebook friends list posted it and wrote about it in glowing terms. Many disabled, chronically ill, brokeass, femme and parent friends of mine reacted to this article with a huge amount of anger, grief and trigger. While it might not have been loewe's intention, for a lot of folks, reading the article brought up a lot of feelings about how the abelism and unsustainabiltiy of movements have pushed us out of them. So, on another chronically ill femme of color organizer day in bed, I read it. I had a lot of feelings. And, fueled by PMS, working-class femme of color crip rage and grief, and some coffee, I pounded out the following article.

Published in Community Care
Wednesday, 17 October 2012 06:26

Community Care: A Conversation

CommunityCareThere is an opening and a flow right now in the conversation on care. People are talking about this everywhere I go. It's as if a dam has broken; the conversation is rushing in like waves. Everyone has an energized opinion, a poignant perspective, a digging question, a heart-felt experience to share, to push up against, to rally around. Community care, self care, our movements, our bodies - there's so much at stake. No wonder things are getting heated. This is a really important conversation about our capacity to survive and thrive, individually and collectively.

Published in Community Care
Tuesday, 16 October 2012 19:14

An End to Self-Care | B Loewe

SelfCareSmallerI’m going to say it. I want to see an end to “self-care.” Can we put a nail in self-care’s coffin and instead birth a newer discussion of community care?

As I most often hear it, self-care stands as an importation of middle-class values of leisure that’s blind to the dynamics of working class (or even family) life, inherently rejects collective responsibility for each other’s well-being, misses power dynamics in our lives, and attempts to serve as a replacement for a politics and practice of desire that could actually ignite our hearts with a fuel to work endlessly.

Published in Community Care
Monday, 15 October 2012 19:13

An End to Self Care | B. Loewe

SelfCareSmallerI’m going to say it. I want to see an end to “self-care.” Can we put a nail in self-care’s coffin and instead birth a newer discussion of community care?

As I most often hear it, self-care stands as an importation of middle-class values of leisure that’s blind to the dynamics of working class (or even family) life, inherently rejects collective responsibility for each other’s well-being, misses power dynamics in our lives, and attempts to serve as a replacement for a politics and practice of desire that could actually ignite our hearts with a fuel to work endlessly.

Published in B Loewe

PSUAn internationally renowned collective, Philly Stands Up is engaging in some of the most innovative work around sexual and gender-based assault, intimate partner violence, and sexual consent in North America. Utilizing a transformative justice framework, the group supports survivors through working primarily with those who have perpetrated assault or abuse. Transformative justice recognizes the interrelatedness of systems of oppression at the root of harm, how harm affects all individuals involved - including the larger community - and that these understandings must inform processes aiming to bring about just responses to acts of harm. Cognizant of the potential for the perpetuation of harm caused by turning to the criminal justice system or pushing people out of town, Philly Stands Up works directly with the person who has caused harm through community-based systems of accountability. In addition to coordinating local accountability processes, the group has published several pamphlets, conducted workshops across North America, and is actively involved in a growing network of groups utilizing transformative justice frameworks in their communities. Responding to the growing interest in accountability processes among radical and sister communities, this interview draws out the collective’s history, core principles, and lessons learned through its organizing work. More information about Philly Stands Up can be found at: www.phillystandsup.com

Published in Community Care

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